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Acing your Midwife Interview

So you have been dreaming about being a midwife, you have gone through the process of writing your personal statement, attended an assessment day and now you have your interview, the final hurdle.

There may be so many feelings running through your head, thinking about your relevant experience, what you wrote in your personal statement, all the reading you have done and worrying about what to wear, what are the panel going to ask you.. how will you stand out?

Although it has been a long process to get to the interview day, the outcome may be a place on your dream course, or getting your dream job.

So here are a few tips to get the best result and you’ll be ready for your interview in no time.

The first impression, yes they do count!

Although some may say that this is shallow, you will be representing the NHS and the profession. By arriving in time, well presented, prepared and professional; you are on the right track!

Dress: It would be recommended to wear professional clothing, smart, clean and tidy.

Piercing and tattoos: It would be recommended that if you have any facial piercings it would be better to remove them for your interview as this will be expected when you are working in the hospital. Visible tattoos on the face, hands, arms, neck or ears, may not be an issue for some, but you may want to cover them as much as possible for your interview.

Jewellery: Keep jewellery to a minimum, too much jewellery can be distracting; in the hospital you can wear on pair of studs, so this might be a good idea for your interview.

Smile

Something as simple as a smile, goes a very long way! This will be the first impression that women get when you are looking after them. Your smile is free. Being friendly and smiling in the interview makes everyone feel at ease, shows your personality and shows that even during stressful times- you can put on a brave face!
Practice

Talking can always be a stressful, worrying about you might be asked, hoping that you don’t say anything wrong, or not knowing the answer. Public speaking might not be your forte, but practicing talking about why you want to be a midwife, why you want to have the job and thinking about possible answers to some of the questions will really help. What makes you different from everyone else? Everyone else in the room wants a place on the course, but they are not you, why should you have a place?

Be prepared

Make sure you come prepared, bring your record of achievement or a folder with certificates, a copy of your personal statement, maybe some notes about what you have read or interested in knowing more about.
It would be a good idea to bring a stocked pencil case, water, lunch and snacks in case the day is longer than you thought.

And breathe

Even if you come away feeling like the interview went as well as it possible could, you will need to wait to hear whether you have been successful. Try not to think about it in the meantime, go for a walk, clear your head, you have made it this far and you have done the best you can.

Good luck!

Article written by Hannah Vallance

Hannah is a Chartered Occupational Psychologist specialising in recruitment, selection and assessment. This means she designs and assesses at selection days just like the ones used for Midwifes, which is pretty handy experience for Midwife Career!

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